Build Common Ground

mobilsemainIn 2015, before the General Election, Migrants Organise worked with community organisations from across the world – Latin Americans, who felt invisible and underrepresented; Kenyans in West London, anxious about the opportunities for their young people; East and North African women, struggling to empower themselves following domestic violence and isolation; Ukrainians who were trying to support friends and family as conflict unfolded at home; domestic workers who were organising in the few hours they had spare on a Sunday – and many more. These diverse groups had diverse interests. Yet, we brought them together and we found common ground: shared experiences of powerlessness, xenophobia and hostility from the press and government, and tireless, thankless organising within communities. We knew that the 2015 election could change our situation, if we organised together. Some communities – Polish and Latin American – had been registering their members to vote to ensure they were a visible, powerful forces in the election. They taught other groups the lessons they had learnt. Collectively, we registered thousands of people to vote.

We knew that our power as voters was with our MPs. We supported migrant community groups in each constituency to meet, plan and organise together. Migrant groups came around the same table to meet with prospective parliamentary candidates and organise hustings. In meetings, community leaders secured concrete commitments on issues that mattered to their communities, a recognition of their power and relationship with their elected representative. More importantly, they began to understand what connected them to other migrant communities in the same area – sometimes shared challenges around buildings; sometimes shared frustrations about working with the local authority; sometimes shared anxiety about a particular local issue – gang violence, housing, racism. In every area, one issue connected migrant communities and brought each group allies in their struggles. From diverse starting points these groups have gone on to build alliances of strength in their local areas. Now, they act together for change and organise from a position of strength.

Good Practice Guide In Accessing Health

Good Practice Guide In Accessing Health

Mar 07 2010

In 2009-2010, this unique project coordinated by MRCF brought together six BME community organisations to address the recommendations of the Primary Concern report…

Moroccan Memories in Britain – Educational Resource

Moroccan Memories in Britain – Educational Resource

Mar 07 2010

This resource pack has been designed to be used in Citizenship lessons. The pack addresses many of the Key Stage 3 Citizenship…

Strange or Citizens: Refugee and migrant participation in local political processes in London

Strange or Citizens: Refugee and migrant participation in local political processes in London

Dec 07 2009

This report draws on discussions at 6 ‘Question Time’ type events attended by between 30 and 60 community representatives from at least…

Newsletter November 2009

Newsletter November 2009

Nov 07 2009

This is the November 2009 issue of The Forum newsletter. In this issue we discuss the constant discourse of immigration and its…

MRCF Newsletter July 2009

MRCF Newsletter July 2009

Jul 07 2009

This is the July 2009 issue of The Forum newsletter. This month we talk about the positive progression that programmes such as…

Losing out Twice? Skill Wastage of Overseas Health Professionals in the UK

Losing out Twice? Skill Wastage of Overseas Health Professionals in the UK

Jan 07 2006

The international migration of highly skilled healthcare professionals to the UK has been a long standing tradition within the NHS and it…

What is British?

What is British?

Jan 07 2004

This book is part of a collection of essays which examine some of the most critical issues for the future of cultural…